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DIY Battery Interrupter

September 29, 2016 in Post, Solution

battery_interrupt03__large

Via DIYability

Materials required

  • Thin copper sheet
  • Thin cardboard
  • 1/8″ (3.5mm) mono audio jack
  • Hook up wire (22 gauge)
  • Wire cutters/strippers
  • Soldering iron, solder and helping hand soldering stand

Step 1

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Using scissors cut two small squares of copper. It is probably best to use older scissors to not dull your good pair. Cut an identical square from a small piece of cardboard the thickness of a postcard or cereal box top is preferred.

Step 2

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Using double sided tape, put the copper squares on either side of the cardboard. Trim the final square to make edges even.

Step 3

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Cut two wires about six inches in length. Strip 1/4″ of plastic from wire on each end.

Using helping hands position the copper clad and wire. Only the stripped part of the wire should be touching the copper.

Gently touch the soldering iron to the stripped wire to heat it. Touch solder to stripped wire. Solder should melt and cover wire and copper.

Flip the copper piece over and prepare second wire. Solder second wire to backside of copper clad.

Final product should have a small solder joint connecting the wires and copper clad on each side. The wires should not wiggle on the copper.

Put the battery interrupt into a battery operated toy. The positive end ( + ) will touch one side of the copper clad, the other side of copper clad will touch the toy’s battery connector.

Turn the toy’s switch ON, with the copper clad in place the toy should not operate. Touch the two wires to activate the toy. Did it work? If so, congrats! If not, double check that the battery interrupt has one side touching the battery and the other side touching the battery holder.

Step 4

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Take the 1/8″ (3.5mm) female switch jack, identify the tabs that will be connected. This particular switch jack has 3 tabs, we will connect a wire to two of them, the tabs on either side, skipping the middle tab.

To connect, bend the wire into a hook and thread it through a tab on the switch jack.

Use helping hands to hold switch jack and wire. With the tabs tightly hooked, fasten the switch and the wire to the helping hands. The wire should be pulled tight so the wire is touching the side of the tab.

Solder the wire and tab together.

After finished with the first wire and tab flip the jack and solder the second tab and wire.

With both wires soldered to the switch jack, the solder pads should be small and the wires should not wiggle. (the middle tab is unused with this particular jack)

Via DIYability

Remember to click the ‘This Helped Me’ button at the top of this page if you give this hack a try!

3D Printed Wheelchair

September 9, 2016 in Post, Solution

Via Thingiverse

3D_Printed_wheelchair_assembled

 

3D printing is doing incredible things for prosthetics, with organisations like E-Nable publishing customisable, open source designs that are affordable, even for kids whose requirements change quickly as they grow.

Could this design be the answer to unaffordable mobility aids for thousands of people across the world? Download the CAD files and check out the full tutorial on Thingiverse.

Make sure to comment or click ‘This Helped Me’ at the top f the page if you make one of these incredible chairs!

Keyboard and button helper

August 31, 2016 in Post, Solution

Via Pinshape

 

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A nifty 3D printing project with great potential to help people with dexterity issues. Head over to Pinshape to download the 3D printing files, which are available in 4 sizes to suit different hands!

Don’t forget to click the ‘This Helped Me’ button at the top of the page if you give this a try.

 

Our favourite disability designs from 2016’s graduates

August 10, 2016 in Post

Our favourite time of year rolls around every July when the exciting projects that design students have been tirelessly working on over the past 9 months are finally revealed. (OK our excitement might have something to do with the sun coming out, but nonetheless it’s a wonderful time of year for design lovers)

We’ve been visiting degree shows around the UK to bring you our top disability design picks for 2016. Here goes!

 

1. A new take on the hearing aid

Saskia Schular Email
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“There is social stigma around the use of hearing aids that prevents people from using them and can make them feel self-conscious when they do; only 1 in 30 adults wear a hearing aid when in reality 1 in 10 would benefit from using them.”

Saskia Schular is a young designer using her passion for jewellery fashion to create statement hearing aids that are anything but quiet.

 

Facebook_Timeline_images_Hearing aids

 

“The hearing aid has been redesigned to be worn with a range of covers, allowing users to decorate and express themselves through their hearing aids. The covers are attached by magnets which allow the user to change them easily and as often as they want. Designs that are ‘fun’, ‘elegant’ and ‘dramatic’ were created using visual metaphors; they ranged from subtle pieces to be worn every day to statement pieces to complete an outfit.”

 

2. An affordable robotic prosthetic

Ben Armstrong Website Email

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“During my research I found amputees were being exploited by prosthetics companies, who were charging tens of thousands for prosthetic arms. I set out to reduce the cost of such prosthetics using a number of novel design concepts, which included 3D printing as well as lifting components from established industries.”

To move the elbow joint, Ben’s design features a motor manufactured in large quantities for the aerospace industry which dramatically reduces costs compared to existing robotic prosthetics.

“I managed to achieve a 98% cost reduction whilst improving the functionality of the arm, relative to the current market leader. The next stage of the project is to ensure it meets all the relative legal directives. Once this has been completed I plan to launch the project via open source networks. The aim is to allow amputees worldwide to benefit from the design.”

 

3. A tremor-friendly teapot

Suzannah Hayes Email LinkedIn
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“Stability is a range of products including an induction heated teapot kettle, a milk jug and a sugar bowl, which provide a simple and stylish solution to help people with a tremor to safely make a hot cup of tea.”

Suzannah worked with physiotherapists and occupational therapists to design a kettle alternative that was safe to use but was also a stylish addition in the kitchen.

“The teapot itself is stainless steel and would be placed in a double layer ceramic bowl which has an induction coil. The handle would have a silicone cover to make it easy to grip and prevent it from being hot to touch. The legs would be aluminium so that they are not affected by the induction heating and therefore do not get hot and the base has been designed in a stylish and practical cork.”

 

4. New no-splash tyre technology

James Long LinkedIn
Facebook_Timeline_images_no more mudguards

 

“The project investigates how a bicycle tyre can be redesigned to reduce the amount of spray created whilst cycling in the wet.”

“The project examines the utilisation of hydrophobic materials and distinct surface patterning. The outcome offers potential benefits within both the bicycle and automotive industries, however, the ultimate aim of the project is to improve the convenience and encourage the uptake of cycling.”

James used computer simulation and a testing rig to develop the new tyre design. We’re excited about the potential application of James’ new technology with wheelchair tyres, to keep both the wheelchair user and anyone pushing a wheelchair splash-free!

 

5. Rethinking the wallet for less nimble fingers

Emily Borton Email LinkedIn
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“Nimble Accessories is a range of purses and wallets designed to ease the stresses of shopping for low dexterity suffers. With the accessories designed to reduce the struggle when at the checkout, with simplifying access to coins and cards.”

Emily was inspired to create a Nimble Accessories after observing her aunt avoid shops because of worries about her ability to pay the cashier.

“Simple tasks, such as handing money over to the cashier, became stressful and she got very flustered. My aunt would rather ask family and friends around her to go to the counter to pay instead of facing it herself. It even came to the point of turning away from shops so she wouldn’t have to be seen or judged for her struggles by members of the public around her. ”

 

6. Improving intimate occasions for ostomates

Stephanie Monty Email LinkedIn
Facebook_Timeline_images_Ostomy Cover

 

“This new appliance is designed for both men and women in intimate occasions. Users can choose from a range of embossed designs inspired by tattoos, lingerie and body art, whilst the unique manufacturing process means it can be personalised according to the individual’s medical requirements.”

Stephanie Monty was inspired to tackle this challenge by her family’s own experiences living with Crohn’s Disease.

“This appliance empowers people to feel more confident with their body and provides some freedom from an ostomy pouch. There are over 120,000 ostomates in the UK alone and despite a wide range of highly advanced appliances, outstanding issues with their functionality and especially their aesthetics merely compound the social stigma surrounding this subject.”

 

7. Timekeeping and navigation for people with visual impairments

Tom Yates Email Website
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“Orbit is the world’s most inclusive watch. The product communicates time to all sighted, partially sighted and totally blind individuals.”

Tom’s design addresses the challenges navigating the built environment faced by many with visual impairments, especially in new and unfamiliar environments. The watch is designed for people with visual impairments but could prove useful for others, secretive time-check in a meeting anyone?!

“A unique feature of the product is the built in tactile compass, making Orbit the first watch to deliver a compass bearing through the medium of sensory touch.”

8.
HEAL- An intelligent aid to assist healing of fractures

Emily McNamara Email

Facebook_Timeline_images_HEAL

“HEAL uses smart technology to enable swifter healing. Patients wear the device during any time they are mobile. When a patient lowers their foot and puts weight on their injured leg, this weight is detected. This triggers a vibration within the device which acts as a signal to relieve the weight from the foot.”

Emily’s design is intended to create a better relationship between patients and staff, empowering patients to take control of their care and reducing the need for staff to remind patients not to bear weight on an injured leg.

“By trusting the patients to remove and put on the product themselves, staff allow patients to take an active role in their own care; returning to them some of their lost independence.”

 

We’re inspired by each of these innovative disability designs, if you are too please let us know in the comments!

opening sports cap drinks

April 20, 2016 in Challenge, Post

Do you have a special technique to open pesky sports cap drinks?

Hair washing fix

April 20, 2016 in Post

Originally posted here

Bend a washing up brush (the kind with a foam pad and reservoir for the washing up liquid) and fill with shampoo and water mix for an easier hair washing experience.

Washing_up Brish_hair_washer

Spray bottle fix

April 19, 2016 in Post, Solution

Originally posted here

Make spray bottles easier to use with a pair of scissor action salad tongs. This sounds like a great fix for people with arthritis, reduced grip strength or cerebral palsy who want to get involved with the household chores! Why not try it on some spray window cleaner?

Use a hacksaw to chop off the handle, and some hot glue or tape to attach it to the spray trigger.

Adapted_spray_bottle

Sugru tactile buttons

April 19, 2016 in Post, Solution

Originally posted here

A great fix for increasing independence – use small Sugru sausages to stick on buttons so someone with a visual impairment can find the button they want.

Here’s a microwave that’s been hacked with Sugru!

Sugru_microwave

Easy grip pop bottle opener

April 19, 2016 in Post, Solution

Originally posted here

A quick 3D printing project that will easily fit in your pocket or bag for use out and about!

Great for anyone with reduced grip strength or arthritis, and anyone who has to battle with tricky bottle tops.

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Download 3D printer files

Cracked-it’s New Look

March 10, 2016 in Post

The New Look

Over the last few months we’ve been working on improving the way users interact with cracked-it to ensure that the process is a straight forward and enjoyable as possible and we are happy to announce that we have just launched our brand new page based text editor, you can now contribute to the site directly through each webpage when logged in.

Below is a quick look at the new editor, you can now input text, images and hyper-links, embed videos and upload pdfs and other relevant file types to your post directly through the new webpage text editor and click submit to post! If you’re not quite happy with your post, you can always save it as a ‘draft’ and come back to it later, all your published and draft posts can be accessed through the ‘My Posts’ link in the right hand sidebar.

Cracked-it Editor

Your Posts

As we briefly mentioned above, we’ve now added a ‘My Posts’ section to cracked-it allowing each using to manage their content quickly and easily. The new ‘My Posts’ manager is shown in the image below, here you can see all the posts you’ve published and edit, delete and share them as you require.

Cracked-it My Posts

 

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